POROJO!

 
12.10.2016
 
#PEARLHARBOR75
 
(Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)
 
This week marked the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. In a surprise strike by the Japanese, 2,400 Americans died in what then President Franklin D. Roosevelt called “a day which will live in infamy.” After being reluctant to join the war effort, the U.S. entered World War II in direct response to the assault. Later this month, Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe is set to become the first sitting Japanese official to visit the memorial at Pearl Harbor. This comes after President Obama visited Hiroshima, Japan, the site of the dropping of the Atomic bomb earlier this year in ceremonial displays of reconciliation.

Read More

 
SOFIA GETS SUED
 
By her own offspring…not even born yet. Yeah, we know. You totally didn’t see that one coming. According to the New York Post, the lawsuit seeks to turn over custody of the frozen embryos to Vegara’s ex-fiance Nick Loeb so they can be brought to life and receive the trust set up for them. The embryos, listed as plaintiffs Emma and Isabella, were created when the Vegara and Loeb were still together back in 2013. Vegara has moved on and is now married to “Magic Mike” star Joe Manganiello… maybe Loeb should also #getalife…or wait… is that what he is trying to give his yet-to-be-born daughters? We’ll await the outcome of this one…
 
TIME for TRUMP
 
(Twitter / @TIME)
 
It’s official, the 2016 “TIME” Magazine person of the year is none other than President-elect Donald J. Trump. While calling our future President a “real change-maker”, the piece describes Trump as a “huckster” and calls Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton an “American Moses.” The article highlights how Trump “magnified the divisions of the present, inspiring new levels of anger and fear within his country,” while Mrs. Clinton “became a symbol in a fight that was about much more than symbolism.” Um… all we can say to that is: #BiasAlert.
 
SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
 
Immigrants around the country are concerned about what the Donald Trump presidency will mean for their future in America. In fact, one organization in Texas is so concerned they’re hosting 100 forums and a series of events to help immigrants learn their rights. In Chicago, Mayor Rahm Emanuel has set up a fund for illegal immigrants to use for legal aide and cities across the nation are promising sanctuary. But is it legal?

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QUEEN BEY SLAYS GRAMMY’S (EARLY)
 
All hail Queen Bey. Beyoncé is up for a whopping nine Grammy nominations after her extremely successful album Lemonade. I mean who wouldn’t want to drink lemonade whipped up by Beyoncé, am I right? Beyoncé has some fierce competition for album of the year from Adele, Drake, Justin Bieber and country singer Sturgill Simpson. The superstar is the most nominated woman of all time having received 62 nominations, winning 20. #SlayedIt

Read More

 
Issue. 060.
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A PRESS STATEMENT December 16th ,2016(death of a kenyan abroad)

                                       
                                         A PRESS STATEMENT

It was with deep regret that  the government received the news last Sunday, of
the death of Mr. Zakayo Muriuki Gatimu, in an Ethiopian hospital.
The Ethiopian authorities arrested the late Zakayo Muriuki Gatimu
on 10 th January, 2015, in Jijiga, Ethiopia. He was arrested walking
out of the compound of the client who had contracted his employer
company, BSS Ltd, to install a VSAT Satellite in Jijiga. Jijiga is
about 381 miles East of Addis Ababa near the Somalia boarder. On
the same date, another Kenyan, Mr. Jedrick Mugo (Radio Frequency
Engineer of Space Engineering Company alongside a Mr. Ali Basir
was also arrested in the same region of Jijiga.
The Government has been aware of the imprisonment of Mr.
Muriuki in Ethiopia, and our Embassy in Addis Ababa has been
engaged with both his family and the Government of Ethiopia in a
bid to resolve the case and have Mr. Muriuki and his colleague
return home.
We can confirm that investigations to establish the circumstances
of his death are underway and we have been assured of full
cooperation from the Ethiopian authorities.At this time, our primary concern is with the family of Zack
Muriuki, who we have been assisting to repatriate the body. We will
continue to stand with them as arrangements for the funeral are
finalized.
We express sincere condolences to the family and assure them of
continued government support at this difficult time.
Government remains engaged in efforts to secure the release of Mr.
Muriuki’s colleague, Mr. Jedrick Mugo.

We continue to urge their
employers to come forth with critical information needed by the
Ethiopian Government to shed more light into the case. Their
continued silence threatens to cripple the Embassy’s efforts to
secure Mr. Mugo’s release.
Government would like to issue a cautionary reminder to citizens
living in foreign countries, especially those which are politically
volatile and conflict prone, to maintain the highest levels of
vigilance. It is incumbent on Kenyans living abroad to be cognizant
of laws in those countries and make every effort to observe them.
The liberties enjoyed under the Kenyan constitution are not
standard across the  board.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is always at hand to advice Kenyans
considering or pursuing opportunities outside the country. They
are able to advise citizens on appropriate pre-cautionary measures
to take, laws to observe, and avenues to pursue for assistance in
the event of certain possible eventualities. Citizens worldwide are
always in better standing seeking such guidance before leaving
their home countries. This places Government in a better position
to adequately assist Kenyans who find themselves in difficult,
dangerous or compromising situations while in a foreign country.

KIRAITHE E.K. (MBS)
Government Spokesperson

A press release-JAMHURI DAY CELEBRATIONS.

DECEMBER 9 TH 2016
PRESS RELEASE
NATIONAL JAMHURI DAY CELEBRATIONS

Inline image 1

 
Nairobi, Kenya—On Monday 12 th December 2016, official Jamhuri day celebrations will be held
at Nyayo Stadium, Nairobi. The function will begin at 10am. President Uhuru will preside
over the day’s festivities. All Kenyans are welcome to participate in the shared celebrations. The
stadium will be accessible to the public from 7am. The overall theme of this year’s celebrations will
be peace, unity and patriotism among Kenyans.
As Kenyans all over the country mark our 53 rd Jamhuri Day, events will take place both in Nairobi
and across all counties led by county Commissioners. Stringent security arrangements have been
made and traffic management measures effected to ensure the safety of our citizens, as well as safety and efficiency on our roads.
With respect to the use of roads for the main function at Nyayo Stadium in Nairobi, the public is
advised as follows:
1. Aérodrome road will be closed to the general public. The road shall be accessible to accredited vehicles only. Other vehicles will be diverted to other routes as appropriate.
2. Heavy commercial vehicles coming from Nakuru and/or Mombasa will not be permitted onto Uhuru Highway on the material day. They will instead be required to use the Nairobi
Southern Bypass.
We wish all Kenyans an enjoyable and peaceful Jamhuri Day.

A PRESS STATEMENT:blog post.(the health strike).

A PRESS STATEMENT ON HEALTH STRIKE
6 TH DECEMBER 2016

 

Inline image 1

 

The Ministry of Health deeply regrets the prevailing Kenya Medical Practitioners, Pharmacists
and Dentists Union (KMPDU) organized strike. The Ministry recognizes and deeply values the
critical role medical practitioners play in Kenya. The Ministry also acknowledges that the
fundamental issues being raised by the trade union are valid. They are part of a conversation that
has spanned several administrations and constitutional dispensations. The Ministry of Health
assures the medical community that it indeed agrees, in principle, with the need to improve
service conditions for doctors in public health institutions who provide invaluable service to our
Nation.
This therefore necessitates robust engagement between the KMPDU, The National Treasury, the
Salaries and Remuneration Commission, the Council of Governors, and the Ministry of East
African Community, Labor and Social Protection, in order to reach satisfactory solutions that are
ethically acceptable and legally and fiscally practicable. The Ministry of Health remains ready to
facilitate good-faith discussions between all the concerned parties. To that end, The Ministry of
Health has convened a meeting between the afore mentioned parties, which is scheduled to take
place this afternoon at Afya House. It is our hope and confidence that this meeting will yield a
workable agreement.
The Government notes with grave concern that the strike has disrupted the enjoyment of basic,
fundamental rights for citizens across the country, and is causing incalculable pain and grief
across the country. Countless Kenyans—mothers, fathers and children—in need of emergency
attention are unable to access it. Many have been left teetering on the precipice of death. Some have succumbed to ailments through the lack of medical attention. This cannot continue. We
believe that the issues raised can be solved.
In light of the above, and in view of the acute suffering which the ongoing strikes are causing to
Kenyans across the country, the Ministry of Health continues to urgently appeal to the KMPDU
to call off the strike, and return to work.
The Government trusts that members of this esteemed medical community—who have served
Kenyans with distinction over the years—will continue to hold their call to service and their oath
of office in good conscience, by returning to the negotiation table while allowing critical health
services to resume.

A PRESS statement,about:-the HEALTH CRISIS.

 

 

 

 

Inline image 1

 

The Ministry of Health deeply regrets the prevailing Kenya Medical Practitioners, Pharmacists
and Dentists Union (KMPDU) organized strike. The Ministry recognizes and deeply values the
critical role medical practitioners play in Kenya. The Ministry also acknowledges that the
fundamental issues being raised by the trade union are valid. They are part of a conversation that
has spanned several administrations and constitutional dispensations. The Ministry of Health
assures the medical community that it indeed agrees, in principle, with the need to improve
service conditions for doctors in public health institutions who provide invaluable service to our
Nation.
This therefore necessitates robust engagement between the KMPDU, The National Treasury, the
Salaries and Remuneration Commission, the Council of Governors, and the Ministry of East
African Community, Labor and Social Protection, in order to reach satisfactory solutions that are
ethically acceptable and legally and fiscally practicable.

The Ministry of Health remains ready to
facilitate good-faith discussions between all the concerned parties.

To that end, The Ministry of
Health has convened a meeting between the afore mentioned parties, which is scheduled to take
place this afternoon at Afya House. It is  hoped and  with confidence that this meeting will yield a
workable agreement.
The Government notes with grave concern that the strike has disrupted the enjoyment of basic,
fundamental rights for citizens across the country, and is causing incalculable pain and grief
across the country.

Countless Kenyans—mothers, fathers and children—in need of emergency
attention are unable to access it. Many have been left teetering on the brink of death. Some have succumbed to ailments through the lack of medical attention. This cannot continue.

We believe that the issues raised can be solved.
In light of the above, and in view of the acute suffering which the ongoing strikes are causing to
Kenyans across the country, the Ministry of Health continues to urgently appeal to the KMPDU
to call off the strike, and return to work.
The Government trusts that members of this esteemed medical community—who have served
Kenyans with distinction over the years—will continue to hold their call to service and their oath
of office in good conscience, by returning to the negotiation table while allowing critical health
services to resume.

hlm2,2nd HIGH LEVEL MEETING. 12 reasons why it matters.

Global Partnership Nairobi Outcome Document

 

 Based on an inclusive consultation that concluded in Kenya at the Global Partnership’s HLM2, the Nairobi Outcome Document was released on 1 December 2016. This document will help to shape how existing and new development actors can partner to implement Agenda 2030 and realise the SDGs.
The Global Partnership tracks progress in the implementation of Busan commitments for more effective
development co-operation through its monitoring framework comprised of a set of 10 indicators. These indicators
focus on strengthening developing country institutions, increasing transparency and predictability of development
co-operation, enhancing gender equality, as well as supporting greater involvement of civil society, parliaments
and private sector in development efforts.
The monitoring framework is currently being refined to fully reflect the
2030 Agenda and will contribute to the review of targets for SDG 5 and 17 and implementation of the Financing for
Development agreement
 
 

 



 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
THE SECOND HIGH-LEVEL MEETING:
Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation
Second High-Level Meeting, Nairobi 28 November-1 December 2016
 
We’re aligning what we do with global priorities.
Our work is all about making Agenda 2030 and the
Sustainable Development Goals happen. Everything
we do is aligned to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda.
We are committed to the Paris Agreement and its entry
into force. We will honour the Sendai Framework for
Disaster Risk Reduction, the World Humanitarian Summit
Commitments to Action, and the New Urban Agenda. We
will work together, deepening existing partnerships and
building new ones, to confront together the development
challenges of our time.
We’re changing our approach to development
co-operation.
We live in an inter-dependent world that
has enormous potential but faces mounting volatility and
uncertainty. How countries, businesses, civil society,
sub-national governments, communities and individuals
answer these challenges will shape the society, economy
and environment of our common future. We believe the
answers can be found through principled and practical
partnerships between equals. This means a change
in behaviour and approach away from the benefactor-
beneficiary and donor-recipient mentalities of the past.
Instead it means we all look to one another as partners:
partners in development and partners for development.
We value political leadership by national
counterparts.
Aligning to Agenda 2030 and the global
SDGs means aligning to support the institutions
that will make it happen. Central to this is the
sovereign role of parliament: the legislative branch of
government that brings the SDGs home. Parliaments
will be central to how the SDGs translate into
national priorities and resource allocations, and how
performance is overseen in a transparent, inclusive
way. The Global Partnership will bring resources
and learning to the effort to help each nationally-led
response become more effective.
We shall complete the unfinished business of the
MDGs.
Official Development Assistance is central—
and essential—to completing the unfinished business
of the MDGs. This is why it is at the heart of the work
of the Global Partnership. Indeed, the push to make
development co-operation more effective is in large
part due to commitments made around ODA, both by
partners providing support, and by those receiving it.
We believe Official Development Assistance will be at
the forefront of Agenda 2030, and it can complement
and catalyse new and complementary assets and
resources entering the development marketplace. We
will promote the efficient and effective use of ODA for
all partners working through the Global Partnership.
We are financing for development in a joined up
way.
No country has ever progressed on its own
terms while depending only on the contributions
of others. We make a strong case for the primary
importance of countries mobilising and using their own
domestic resources. This means countries taking the
unequivocal lead over all sources of finance available
for their own development. It means international co-
operation to stop and reverse illicit financial flows. It
means capitalising on the networks and resources of
the diaspora. It means effectively using international
public finance, such as Official Development
Assistance and other official flows. It means creating
an enabling environment to attract and grow private
investment. It means stimulating and nurturing
local entrepreneurship. It means, in sum, reaching
to deliver the Addis Ababa Action Agenda through
effective development co-operation.
We will promote science, technology and
innovation.
We share the view that the creation,
development and diffusion of innovation and
TheGlobalPartnership
technologies and associated know-how, including
the transfer of technology on mutually agreed terms,
are powerful drivers of sustainable development. We
also recognise that society and economy has become
increasingly digital, but the divide remains significant
both within populations and between countries. We are
a platform that intends to grow collaboration for effective
development co-operation. We recognise that science,
technology and innovation are fundamental to what we
stand for. We will partner with centres of excellence and
academia, drawing on traditional knowledge and new, to
confront our common challenges.
We are going to leave no-one behind.
Exclusion
has consequences. It exacerbates social division,
puts a drag on economic activity, and can lead to
political upheaval. The Millennium Development Goals
could have achieved more if there was an explicit and
consistent focus on reaching those furthest behind
first. That is why countries facing fragility and conflict
need humanitarian and development support working
in concert. Women, young and elderly people, people
living with disabilities and other disadvantaged groups
who are marginalised by society and economy can
add substantially to wealth creation and productivity,
so long as there is investment.
We focus on making things happen for countries.
A global agenda only becomes real at the national
and sub-national levels. It only works if its returns
are evident in the lives of people and in the health
of the environment. Seventy per cent of the world’s
population will live in cities by 2030. They are
networking at regional and global levels more
creatively than ever before. At the same time, national
governments are devolving authority to levels at
which action and accountability make more sense
for local people and partners alike. That is why the
Global Partnership is redirecting its energy towards
strengthening partnerships at the country level.
We will offer space for everyone’s voice.
A big
agenda needs a big response. The whole of society
has a part to play. Whether you are civil society
partners who want to influence the way development
priorities are shaped and carried out, or businesses
that want to work with policy makers on the right
enabling environment to invest and manage risk while
creating new markets, the Global Partnership will
help. This space is something we call an ‘intangible
asset’: a stable, predictable and open venue needed
by everyone. Partners say that this is something
precious, so we are changing to become more
inclusive and to improve your access where it matters,
particularly at the country level.
We are open for –and to—business.
We will direct
development co-operation to become an enabler
of private investment. We will work to substantially
grow this practice, based on innovation and trust-
building actions across public and business sectors.
Forging a new, shared vision for effective public-
private partnerships supported by development
co-operation finance will lay the foundation for the
Global Partnership’s contribution to SDGs attainment.
We intend to announce a Nairobi Action Agenda
that will concentrate on making the instruments of
development co-operation ready to engage business
at scale.
We monitor what we do.
The best way to find out
what is happening where is to keep track. It is the
best way to learn about one another, to promote
transparency and to use performance to inform
policy choices. The Global Partnership already
invests heavily in monitoring how partners are
doing to promote ownership, results, transparency
and accountability, and the way it partners. These
monitoring exercises are led by countries and the
findings are reported directly to the United Nations
High-Level Political Forum. For businesses and new
partners joining the Global Partnership, monitoring
will help shed light on what it takes to build strong,
trusting relationships and guide our priorities. The
returns on investment can be substantial.
We will learn and adapt.
The Global Partnership
is committed to recognise and respect different
approaches towards Agenda 2030. For instance,
businesses adopting the Triple Bottom Line of social,
environmental and commercial sustainability have
a lot to offer and we have much to learn from their
experiences. Southern partners are committed to
effective development co-operation, as expressed
through the 2009 Nairobi Outcome Document of the
United Nations High-Level Conference on South-
South Co-operation. Two years from now, the
South will meet again to commemorate the fortieth
anniversary of a landmark event in Buenos Aires. We
hope to share our experiences as the South prepares
for that important milestone.
#HLM2,#WHATWOMENWANT,
#GETINTHERING,#CSOPARTNERSHIPS
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

info

HLM2,,speeches,,videos,,outcome documents,,,,,,,,

Watch videos about the Global Partnership and HLM2

CSO imperatives for a successful outcome document

We, the 400 civil society organisations from across the globe come together with one voice at
the 2 nd High Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-­‐operation.
We join in taking stock of the implementation of development effectiveness principles and
commitments. We share the aspiration to position the Global Partnership to effectively
contribute to implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Addis
Ababa Action Agenda.

At the close of the first day, we collectively reflect on how far we have come and the challenges
that still face us.

On our Core Business: Effective Development Co-­‐operation Commitments
CSOs are concerned that the latest draft of the Nairobi Outcome Document fails to reaffirm the
effective development co-­‐operation commitments made since Paris. Further, it is unacceptable
to define development co-­‐operation simply as a catalyst for other forms of financing. This
definition ignores the value of using public funds to intervene for the public good in an inclusive
and accountable manner.

We call upon all parties to the GPEDC to focus on ways effective development co-­‐operation can
support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. We strongly recommend the
universal application of effective development co-­‐operation principles through an inclusive
monitoring framework with clear indicators that recognise the multidimensionality of
development.

On Civic Space and the Enabling Environment
We demand the Nairobi Outcome Document to have an explicit reference to the shrinking and
closing space for civil society, and clearly reference the Busan commitment on providing
enabling environment for civil society. However, the negotiations are still contentious in
recognising the situation of CSOs in many countries and upholding previous commitments to
create an enabling environment for CSOs.

We urge the comprehensive alignment of country-­‐level legal and regulatory frameworks with
human rights standards. Further, we demand and commit to work in facilitating and effectively
institutionalising CSO spaces, multi-­‐stakeholder partnerships and social dialogue. We recall the
Istanbul Principles on CSO Development Effectiveness in pursuing our own effectiveness and
accountability.

On the Role of Private Sector in Development
CSOs note that the current dominant discourse in GPEDC is to unleash the potential of
development co-­‐operation to attract private investments. It is deeply alarming that the
challenge of leaving no-­‐one behind is being promoted as an opportunity for private capital to
develop markets. Our experience on the ground has shown that private capital is not an
instrument to address inequality. Further, there is little evidence to support the claims that
private investments effectively raise public revenue or drive down the cost of access to goods
and services.

We demand for all stakeholders to ensure business and corporate accountability and
transparency in the context of development co-­‐operation programmes. Recognising that an
increasing role for the private sector in development presents inherent risks, we therefore call
for the role of the private sector in development co-­‐operation to be consistent and accountable
with the Busan principles, as well as labour, environmental, and other human rights standards.

On the GPEDC Mandate
We are concerned that there seems to be a move towards diluting GPEDC’s mandate of
strengthening the effectiveness of development co-­‐operation. GPEDC’s added value must not be
merely to provide country-­‐level data to the UN, as this would constitute a rejection of GPEDC’s
distinctive traits, especially its inclusive multi-­‐stakeholder character.

We call on all parties to uphold the integrity of the EDC agenda to contribute in implementing
the SDGs. We reaffirm the unique multi-­‐stakeholder character of GPEDC and ask that this be
demonstrated through genuine inclusiveness and parity in leadership and representation.

View the live-stream (English)

Global Meeting – HLM2 – Speech delivered at the Opening Session – KICC, Nairobi, Kenya: November 28, 2016.

BY

TETET LAURON – Co- Chair, Policy Advocacy – CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness (CPDE) and CPDE Representative in the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC);

Your Excellency Mr. President, Honorable Ministers, distinguished guests,

I wish to thank the government of Kenya and the Co-Chairs of the Global Partnership for inviting me to speak during this opening session of the second High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership. It is an important recognition that the civil society organisations I represent are independent development actors in their own right. We are here to speak, we are here to act, and we are here to collaborate with all of you for a more effective development co-operation.

First, civil society organisations are here to speak. What I mean by this is that we feel compelled to recall the long history of aid and development effectiveness commitments, fifteen years of hard work, promises, deep policy discussions and best practices that risk being forgotten in the face of new competing priorities. Don’t get me wrong. Civil society fully supports the Sustainable Development Goals and will do its part to achieve them. But this should not come at the expense of the effective development co-operation agenda, which remains crucial to those who are furthest behind. We will continue to uphold the commitments made in Paris, Accra, Busan, Mexico City and Nairobi because we believe in mutual accountability. We know from our experience at grassroots level that mutual accountability does produce results when there is trust based on promises met.

Second, we are here to act. If there’s one thing we have learned from the first two Progress Reports of the Global Partnership is that we are moving forward too slowly. In some cases, we are stuck or even going backwards. Civil society organisations are determined to help move in the right direction. By turning our Istanbul Principles on CSO Development Effectiveness into everyday action, we want to improve our intervention locally and globally to help deliver development results to the people who need them most. Today, we recommit to walk the talk and hope each Global Partnership member will do the same.

Third, we are here to collaborate. Delivering effective development co-operation in the context of Agenda 2030 will require everyone’s contribution – and we civil society organisations cannot fulfill our full potential to contribute if we are being constricted, harassed or killed. We need your help to preserve an environment that allows all of us to operate safely and productively.

You may be thinking now “Here they go again. Civil society ranting time!”. In fact, what I am saying concerns all of us. Only two years ago many of us were sitting in another big room like this one for the first High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership. You may recall a brave social entrepreneur, Sabeen Mahmoud, who came to the High-Level Meeting to share her experience as a social activist and start-up founder. Perhaps you even shook her hand. Last year Sabeen was shot dead while driving her car because of her human rights work. She was only 40. I would like us to take a few moments to remember Sabeen.

When civil society is struck at its core by violence, repression and intolerance, the whole of society suffers. Sabeen used to say: “Fear is just a line in your head. You can choose what side of that line you want to be on”. I hope we can forge a stronger Global Partnership at this High-Level Meeting and choose to be together on the side of progress – for people, for planet, for prosperity, and for peace.

Thank you.

Migrants, Diasporas and Development Effectiveness

 

I would like to thank the Global Council of CPDE for this historical opportunity to present on our proposed establishment of a constituency of Migrants and Diasporas within the CPDE.

 I am also currently the chairperson of the International Migrants Alliance or IMA – a first global alliance of grassroots migrants and refugees with more than 150 member organizations from 40 countries in all global regions.

Last year, we in IMA submitted to the CPDE Global Council an Expression of Interest to create a constituency for 244 migrants and 65.3 millions of displaced people including 21.3 millions refugees and 10 million stateless people in the world.

We sincerely appreciate for interest of Global Council in this endeavor. The support provided by CPDE has enabled us to start the process of developing this constituency.

Let me just reiterate the motto of motivation and declaration that IMA adopted and continue to uphold from the time of our establishment in 2008. In IMA, we said that: “For a long time, others spoke on our behalf. Now we speak for ourselves.”

Since then, we did and we continue to grab every opportunity and beyond create all possible spaces for migrants and displaced peoples – especially from the grassroots – to speak, engage and be involved actors for human rights, justice, and development.

Last 17 and 18 of September in New York City, migrants and diaspora organizations gathered for the second time in a conference to further explored the development effectiveness agenda of our sector. We also formulate initial plans on education, outreach, advocacy and engagement.

The conference was a follow up of our preliminary discussions conducted in Istanbul last October 2015 but also solidified our analyses based on the sharing of grassroots participations on the realities that migrant, diaspora and refugee faced on the ground.

Following are the major points that we united on:

  • Official development assistance (ODA) and development policies should address the root causes of forced displacement and respond to the rights and wellbeing of migrants and diaspora. However, ODA failed to address unemployment, underemployment, landlessness, constricting access to social services, and climate change-induced displacement. Worst, ODA-funded projects and programs also lay the ground for forced national and international displacement
  • Especially in Asian countries, labor export programs are further systematized with private businesses, particularly placement agencies, providing increased opportunities for unregulated profit-making from the migration process.  Services are not made available by governments for those in crisis and adequate protection is not provided for those in transit.
  • Development aid is increasingly being used to fund border security measures which also the reason on the growing trend of increased criminalization of migrants and refugees.
  • Current development discussions relating to migration are often inappropriately centred on the utilisation and maximisation of economic remittances and other economic contributions of migrants. Greater focus should be directed at creating economic, political and social conditions that will address the root causes of displacement and forced migration, as well as ensure an end to precarity of migrants in host countries
  • Engagement of migrants and diaspora organisations has been improving in different national, regional and international spaces which have resulted in some significant gains.  However, disparities and gaps in engaging these spaces persist.
  • The promotion of legal instruments such as relevant UN conventions and ILO agreements lack the necessary political action and commitment to bring genuine change.

To date, migrant and diaspora organizations engaged in migration and development effectiveness discussions consist of grassroots groups and grassroots-based CSOs doing work with migrants or refugees. They are based on all global regions.

The New York meeting resolved to conduct more outreach to migrant/diaspora organizations with attention to the further marginalized sections of the sector – migrant youth, migrant women, migrant LGBTs and migrants with disabilities.

Education on development effectiveness and how it relates to their current work and strategic objectives was identified to be crucial. Outreach for partnership purpose will also be done to other sectors.

Meanwhile, some of the concrete engagement opportunities in the international level include the annual Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD), the High Level Political Forum on Agenda 2030, and the process leading to the creation of the global compacts on migrants and refugees.

The Global Compact led by UN engagement is especially significant for IMA, as I myself as the IMA chairperson, was given the privilege to speak as migrants CSO representative in the opening plenary of the UN General Assembly last September 19 in time of UN Summit on Migrants and Refugees.

With these, we really hope that the CPDE Global Council will agree on the importance of establishing a constituency for Migrants and Diasporas. This constituency will provide valuable inputs to the CPDE, enhance the platform of engagements in arenas discussing migration, and involve even more CSOs from the marginalized sectors into the work on development effectiveness and effective development cooperation.

Thank you very much.

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Leaving No One
Behind

Actions to Improve
the Effectiveness of
Development
Co-operation

Busan Outcome Document

THE SECOND HIGH-LEVEL MEETING: 12 REASONS WHY IT MATTERS
Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation
Second High-Level Meeting, Nairobi 28 November-1 December 2016
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We’re aligning what we do with global priorities.
Our work is all about making Agenda 2030 and the
Sustainable Development Goals happen. Everything
we do is aligned to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda.
We are committed to the Paris Agreement and its entry
into force. We will honour the Sendai Framework for
Disaster Risk Reduction, the World Humanitarian Summit
Commitments to Action, and the New Urban Agenda. We
will work together, deepening existing partnerships and
building new ones, to confront together the development
challenges of our time.
We’re changing our approach to development
co-operation.
We live in an inter-dependent world that
has enormous potential but faces mounting volatility and
uncertainty. How countries, businesses, civil society,
sub-national governments, communities and individuals
answer these challenges will shape the society, economy
and environment of our common future. We believe the
answers can be found through principled and practical
partnerships between equals. This means a change
in behaviour and approach away from the benefactor-
beneficiary and donor-recipient mentalities of the past.
Instead it means we all look to one another as partners:
partners in development and partners for development.
We value political leadership by national
counterparts.
Aligning to Agenda 2030 and the global
SDGs means aligning to support the institutions
that will make it happen. Central to this is the
sovereign role of parliament: the legislative branch of
government that brings the SDGs home. Parliaments
will be central to how the SDGs translate into
national priorities and resource allocations, and how
performance is overseen in a transparent, inclusive
way. The Global Partnership will bring resources
and learning to the effort to help each nationally-led
response become more effective.
We shall complete the unfinished business of the
MDGs.
Official Development Assistance is central—
and essential—to completing the unfinished business
of the MDGs. This is why it is at the heart of the work
of the Global Partnership. Indeed, the push to make
development co-operation more effective is in large
part due to commitments made around ODA, both by
partners providing support, and by those receiving it.
We believe Official Development Assistance will be at
the forefront of Agenda 2030, and it can complement
and catalyse new and complementary assets and
resources entering the development marketplace. We
will promote the efficient and effective use of ODA for
all partners working through the Global Partnership.
We are financing for development in a joined up
way.
No country has ever progressed on its own
terms while depending only on the contributions
of others. We make a strong case for the primary
importance of countries mobilising and using their own
domestic resources. This means countries taking the
unequivocal lead over all sources of finance available
for their own development. It means international co-
operation to stop and reverse illicit financial flows. It
means capitalising on the networks and resources of
the diaspora. It means effectively using international
public finance, such as Official Development
Assistance and other official flows. It means creating
an enabling environment to attract and grow private
investment. It means stimulating and nurturing
local entrepreneurship. It means, in sum, reaching
to deliver the Addis Ababa Action Agenda through
effective development co-operation.
We will promote science, technology and
innovation.
We share the view that the creation,
development and diffusion of innovation and
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technologies and associated know-how, including
the transfer of technology on mutually agreed terms,
are powerful drivers of sustainable development. We
also recognise that society and economy has become
increasingly digital, but the divide remains significant
both within populations and between countries. We are
a platform that intends to grow collaboration for effective
development co-operation. We recognise that science,
technology and innovation are fundamental to what we
stand for. We will partner with centres of excellence and
academia, drawing on traditional knowledge and new, to
confront our common challenges.
We are going to leave no-one behind.
Exclusion
has consequences. It exacerbates social division,
puts a drag on economic activity, and can lead to
political upheaval. The Millennium Development Goals
could have achieved more if there was an explicit and
consistent focus on reaching those furthest behind
first. That is why countries facing fragility and conflict
need humanitarian and development support working
in concert. Women, young and elderly people, people
living with disabilities and other disadvantaged groups
who are marginalised by society and economy can
add substantially to wealth creation and productivity,
so long as there is investment.
We focus on making things happen for countries.
A global agenda only becomes real at the national
and sub-national levels. It only works if its returns
are evident in the lives of people and in the health
of the environment. Seventy per cent of the world’s
population will live in cities by 2030. They are
networking at regional and global levels more
creatively than ever before. At the same time, national
governments are devolving authority to levels at
which action and accountability make more sense
for local people and partners alike. That is why the
Global Partnership is redirecting its energy towards
strengthening partnerships at the country level.
We will offer space for everyone’s voice.
A big
agenda needs a big response. The whole of society
has a part to play. Whether you are civil society
partners who want to influence the way development
priorities are shaped and carried out, or businesses
that want to work with policy makers on the right
enabling environment to invest and manage risk while
creating new markets, the Global Partnership will
help. This space is something we call an ‘intangible
asset’: a stable, predictable and open venue needed
by everyone. Partners say that this is something
precious, so we are changing to become more
inclusive and to improve your access where it matters,
particularly at the country level.
We are open for –and to—business.
We will direct
development co-operation to become an enabler
of private investment. We will work to substantially
grow this practice, based on innovation and trust-
building actions across public and business sectors.
Forging a new, shared vision for effective public-
private partnerships supported by development
co-operation finance will lay the foundation for the
Global Partnership’s contribution to SDGs attainment.
We intend to announce a Nairobi Action Agenda
that will concentrate on making the instruments of
development co-operation ready to engage business
at scale.
We monitor what we do.
The best way to find out
what is happening where is to keep track. It is the
best way to learn about one another, to promote
transparency and to use performance to inform
policy choices. The Global Partnership already
invests heavily in monitoring how partners are
doing to promote ownership, results, transparency
and accountability, and the way it partners. These
monitoring exercises are led by countries and the
findings are reported directly to the United Nations
High-Level Political Forum. For businesses and new
partners joining the Global Partnership, monitoring
will help shed light on what it takes to build strong,
trusting relationships and guide our priorities. The
returns on investment can be substantial.
We will learn and adapt.
The Global Partnership
is committed to recognise and respect different
approaches towards Agenda 2030. For instance,
businesses adopting the Triple Bottom Line of social,
environmental and commercial sustainability have
a lot to offer and we have much to learn from their
experiences. Southern partners are committed to
effective development co-operation, as expressed
through the 2009 Nairobi Outcome Document of the
United Nations High-Level Conference on South-
South Co-operation. Two years from now, the
South will meet again to commemorate the fortieth
anniversary of a landmark event in Buenos Aires. We
hope to share our experiences as the South prepares
for that important milestone.